Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness      From research to policy and policy to practice.

Search Icon Subscribe to our Newsletter

In New York City, 1 in 7 public school students will be homeless during elementary school. That is more than 140,000 children in the past six years.

Read More

Registration is now open for the Beyond Housing Conference in NYC, January 10–12, 2018.

Read More

1 in 5 teen parents with children in the NYC Department of Education daycare program for student parents had been homeless in the past 5 years.

Read More

1 in 10 teen parents with children in the NYC Department of Education daycare program for student parents became homeless after the birth or their first child.

Read More

What's New

Webinar: The California Interactive Map

Join our Principal Policy Analyst, Josef Kannegaard and Senior GIS Analyst, Kristen MacFarlane on 10/19 as they walk through the California Interactive Map, looking at where homeless students attend school.

READ MORE

Student Homelessness: The Ever-growing Epidemic

With the release of the annual student homelessness snapshot data from New York State, we learned that in school year 2016–17 more than 111,500 New York City students lived in temporary housing, a 6% jump from the prior year and a 60% increase since 2010–11.

READ MORE

Student Homelessness in New York City School Districts

Delve into data about the homeless student population in NYC’s school districts.

READ MORE

Bringing Data to Life in Your District

At ICPH, we think it's important to push the research beyond the numbers to inform policy and drive practice. That's why we create online apps bringing data to life in your school and district.

READ MORE

What Makes the Difference Between Dropout and Graduation for Homeless Students?

Students living in homeless shelters face more academic challenges than their classmates who live in stable housing. What makes the difference between dropout and graduation for these teens living in unstable housing settings? Can community and school supports lower dropout rates?

READ MORE

What Now? Homeless Students in the Aftermath of Harvey

The water in Houston may be receding, but the damage has been done. Before a single drop of rain fell in the state of Texas, more than 110,000 children in at least 25,000 families were homeless. Now those numbers have swelled into the hundreds of thousands.

READ MORE

How Can Schools Provide Homeless Students with Emotional and Behavioral Support?

Children who experience homelessness are often confronted with roadblocks, potholes, twists, and turns that prevent them from ever reaching their full potential. They are frequently sent to school sleep deprived, malnourished, and with emotional and mental challenges—yet are expected to perform at the same levels as students without the same baggage.

READ MORE

Elementary School Proficiency: What Schools Are Getting It Right for Students in Shelter?

Across the country, children as young as 8 to 10 years old are experiencing homelessness. As a result, measurable gaps in their educational achievement can surface. In New York City, the elementary school outcomes of students living in shelters make a compelling case for providing additional supports to homeless students.

READ MORE

Summer 2017, Vol. 8.1

The Summer 2017 issue of UNCENSORED looks beyond where homeless families sleep to another core issue—their health. Health plays an important role in predicting the future success and productivity of homeless children and their families. Simply put, health problems can not only lead to homelessness, but can make it difficult to escape this most extreme form of poverty.

READ MORE

How Do We Reach Homeless Students in Need?

The only way that educational supports can be effective is if they actually reach the students who need them. Unfortunately, it seems that supports such as English language learning (ELL) and special education services may be missing opportunities to effectively reach young students who are homeless.

READ MORE

Latest publications

On the Map: The Atlas of Student Homelessness in New York City 2017

For the more than 140,000 students in New York City who have been homeless, the impact of housing instability is all too real. These children are not only struggling with maintaining a place to sleep, but also attending school, succeeding academically, and accessing supports for their additional educational and behavioral needs. The 2017 Atlas of Student Homelessness in New York City provides an in-depth look at the educational outcomes of homeless students.

READ MORE

Out of the Shadows: A State-by-State Ranking of Accountability for Homeless Students

A quality education can be the most important tool to helping children and families lift themselves out of a recurring pattern of housing instability. To do that, however, these children must first be identified as homeless and then receive the necessary support to ensure that homelessness does not disrupt their learning.

READ MORE